Categories
Development

Feature Box

Needed to create an area on a web page that could contain several feature items that could be easily navigated through. There are many excellent carousel type components available, but they didn’t meet all my needs or were conflicting with a drop down menu that we have on this particular site. So I decided to create my own solution.

So that it’s semantically correct, all you need is to wrap a div around an ordered list and give that div an id of “feature-box”.

<div id="feature-area">
    <ol>
        <li><img src="http://www.atlantic.edu/aca/images/homeSplashCareer.jpg" width="548" height="200" alt="Turn your passion into a culinary career" /></li>
    	<li><img src="http://www.atlantic.edu/aca/images/homeSplashBaking.jpg" width="548" height="200" alt="Rise to the challenge of a baking and pastry career" /></li>
    	<li><img src="http://www.atlantic.edu/aca/images/homeSplashFire.jpg" width="548" height="200" alt="Get fired up for a culinary career" /></li>
    	<li><img src="http://www.atlantic.edu/aca/images/homeSplashRestaurant.jpg" width="548" height="200" alt="Learn in a real restaurant setting" /></li>
    </ol>
</div>

The rest of my javascript relies pretty heavily on the YUI DOM Collection and the YUI Event Library, so I included their yahoo-dom-event.js file. YUI library is amazing and if you’re not familiar with it I highly recommend you check it out.

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://yui.yahooapis.com/2.6.0/build/yahoo-dom-event/yahoo-dom-event.js"></script>

Then I wrote up a little function that on page load takes the ordered list and only shows the first item and creates the navigation to control the feature box.

init:function(e) {
    // object test if js available
    if (!document.getElementById || !document.createTextNode){return;}
    if (!document.getElementById("feature-area")) return false;
 
    // assign feature-aread div, ol, and items
    var featureDiv = document.getElementById('feature-area');
    var featureOl = featureDiv.getElementsByTagName('ol');
    var featureItems = featureOl[0].getElementsByTagName('li');
 
    // set class on li's to hide and show for the first item
    for (var i=1; i<featureItems.length; i++) {
        YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(featureItems[i], 'hide');
    }
    YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(featureItems[0], 'show');
 
    // create navigation
    var navDiv = document.createElement('div');
    navDiv.setAttribute('id', 'feature-nav');
    navDiv.innerHTML = '<a href="#" id="feature-prev">prev</a> <span id="feature-nav-marker"></span> <a href="#" id="feature-next">next</a>';
 
    // insert navigation
    YAHOO.util.Dom.insertAfter(navDiv, featureOl[0]);
 
    // create nav dots
    for (var i=0; i<featureItems.length; i++) {
        var navMarkerItem = document.createElement('span');
	var navMarkerId = 'feature-nav-'+i;
	navMarkerItem.setAttribute('id', navMarkerId);
	navMarkerItem.innerHTML = 'item '+i;
	var navMarkerList = document.getElementById('feature-nav-marker');
	navMarkerList.appendChild(navMarkerItem);
	// assign class of active to first marker
	if (i==0) {
	    YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(navMarkerItem, 'active');
	}
	YAHOO.util.Event.addListener(navMarkerItem, "click", acccFeatureArea.gotoFeature);
    }
}

First we grab then apply the class of “hide” to all the list items’s. But the very first list item we apply a class of “show”. Now only the first list item is being displayed.

// assign feature-aread div, ol, and items
var featureDiv = document.getElementById('feature-area');
var featureOl = featureDiv.getElementsByTagName('ol');
var featureItems = featureOl[0].getElementsByTagName('li');
 
// set class on li's to hide and show for the first item
for (var i=1; i<featureItems.length; i++) {
    YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(featureItems[i], 'hide');
}
YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(featureItems[0], 'show');

Then we create the navigation. To figure out how many navigation dots to create, we have to figure out how many list items there are. Also those navigation dots need an event handler attached to them so they can be used to control the feature box.

// create navigation
var navDiv = document.createElement('div');
navDiv.setAttribute('id', 'feature-nav');
navDiv.innerHTML = '<a href="#" id="feature-prev">prev</a> <span id="feature-nav-marker"></span> <a href="#" id="feature-next">next</a>';
 
// insert navigation
YAHOO.util.Dom.insertAfter(navDiv, featureOl[0]);
 
// create nav dots
for (var i=0; i<featureItems.length; i++) {
    var navMarkerItem = document.createElement('span');
    var navMarkerId = 'feature-nav-'+i;
    navMarkerItem.setAttribute('id', navMarkerId);
    navMarkerItem.innerHTML = 'item '+i;
    var navMarkerList = document.getElementById('feature-nav-marker');
    navMarkerList.appendChild(navMarkerItem);
    // assign class of active to first marker
    if (i==0) {
        YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(navMarkerItem, 'active');
    }
    YAHOO.util.Event.addListener(navMarkerItem, "click", acccFeatureArea.gotoFeature);
}

Functions are attached to the navigation arrows to reveal the next item in the list while hiding all the other items. If it’s at the end or beginning of the list it then circles around to the first or last item.

nextFeature:function(e) {
    var currentItem = YAHOO.util.Dom.getElementsByClassName('show', 'li', 'feature-area');
    var nextItem = YAHOO.util.Dom.getNextSibling(currentItem[0]); 
    // if no more items, go to first item
    if (nextItem == null) {
        var featureItems = YAHOO.util.Dom.getElementsByClassName('hide', 'li', 'feature-area');
	var nextItem = featureItems[0];
    }
 
    YAHOO.util.Dom.replaceClass(currentItem[0], 'show', 'hide');
    YAHOO.util.Dom.replaceClass(nextItem, 'hide', 'show');
    acccFeatureArea.setMarker();
}

The navigation dots get their own function attached to them to reveal their respective list item. It adjusts the class associated with the list items as well as the navigation dots to control the feature box.

gotoFeature:function(e) {
    // assign feature-aread div, ol, and items
    var featureDiv = document.getElementById('feature-area');
    var featureOl = featureDiv.getElementsByTagName('ol');
    var featureItems = featureOl[0].getElementsByTagName('li');
 
    var navMarker = document.getElementById('feature-nav-marker');
    var navMarkerItems = navMarker.getElementsByTagName('span');
 
    var navMarkerId = this.getAttribute('id');
    var currentSelection = navMarkerId.substring(navMarkerId.length-1);
 
    if (this.className != 'active') {
        for (var i=0; i<featureItems.length; i++) {
	    YAHOO.util.Dom.replaceClass(featureItems[i], 'show', 'hide');	
	}
	YAHOO.util.Dom.replaceClass(featureItems[currentSelection], 'hide', 'show');
 
	for (var i=0; i<navMarkerItems.length; i++) {
	    YAHOO.util.Dom.removeClass(navMarkerItems[i], 'active');
	    YAHOO.util.Dom.addClass(navMarkerItems[currentSelection], 'active');
	}
    }
}

Here is a link to a sample of this.

Categories
Development

Using a Spreadsheet to populate a chart with the Google Visualization API

I’ve been messing around with adding charts/graphs to web pages that can pull their data from a Google Doc Spreadsheet.  That way the chart is updated when the data is updated, instead of placing a static image of a chart on the page.  Conveniently the Google Visualization API makes creating attractive visualization of data fairly easy.  All you have to do is set up a Google Docs Spreadsheet, then do the following steps:

To get the data source url for Google Spreadsheet data sources follow these steps:

  • Create a spreadsheet in the format expected by your gadget.
  • Select the range of cells you want to display in the gadget.
  • From the toolbar, click ‘Insert’ and choose ‘Gadget’.
  • Choose an existing gadget or select ‘Custom’ as the gadget type, enter the URL of your gadget XML specification and click ‘Add’.
  • In the gadget title, click the arrow icon on top right of the title bar.
  • Choose “Get query data source url…” from the popup menu.
Then you can just call that data source url through some javascript on a webpage.